Disrupting Colonial Pedagogies: Theories and Transgressions (Transformations: Womanist studies) (Paperback)

Disrupting Colonial Pedagogies: Theories and Transgressions (Transformations: Womanist studies) By Jillian Ford (Editor), Nathalia E. Jaramillo (Editor), Jillian Ford (Contributions by), Nathalia E. Jaramillo (Contributions by), Silvia Garcia Aguilár (Contributions by), Khalilah Ali (Contributions by), Angela Malone Cartwright (Contributions by), Adriana Diego (Contributions by), LeConté Dill (Contributions by), Samenna Eidoo (Contributions by), Genevieve Flores-Haro (Contributions by), Leena Her (Contributions by), Patricia Krueger-Henney (Contributions by), Claudia Lozáno (Contributions by), Liliana Manriquez (Contributions by), Alberta Salazár (Contributions by), Leon Salazár (Contributions by), Lorri Santamaría (Contributions by) Cover Image

Disrupting Colonial Pedagogies: Theories and Transgressions (Transformations: Womanist studies) (Paperback)

By Jillian Ford (Editor), Nathalia E. Jaramillo (Editor), Jillian Ford (Contributions by), Nathalia E. Jaramillo (Contributions by), Silvia Garcia Aguilár (Contributions by), Khalilah Ali (Contributions by), Angela Malone Cartwright (Contributions by), Adriana Diego (Contributions by), LeConté Dill (Contributions by), Samenna Eidoo (Contributions by), Genevieve Flores-Haro (Contributions by), Leena Her (Contributions by), Patricia Krueger-Henney (Contributions by), Claudia Lozáno (Contributions by), Liliana Manriquez (Contributions by), Alberta Salazár (Contributions by), Leon Salazár (Contributions by), Lorri Santamaría (Contributions by)

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The impact of conquest and colonialism on identity and the construction of knowledge

Jillian Ford and Nathalia E. Jaramillo edit a collection of writings by women that examine womanist worldviews in philosophy, theory, curriculum, public health, and education. Drawing on thinkers like bell hooks and Cynthia Dillard, the essayists challenge the colonizing hegemonies that raise and sustain patriarchal and male-centered systems of teaching and learning. Part One examines how womanist theorizing and creative activity offer a space to study the impact of conquest and colonization on the Black female body and spirit. In Part Two, the contributors look at ways of using text, philosophy, and research methodologies to challenge colonizing and colonial definitions of womanhood, enlightenment, and well-being. The essays in Part Three undo the colonial pedagogical project and share the insights they have gained by freeing themselves from its chokehold.

Powerful and interdisciplinary, Disrupting Colonial Pedagogies challenges colonialism and its influence on education to advance freer and more just forms of knowledge making.

Contributors: Silvia García Aguilár, Khalilah Ali, Angela Malone Cartwright, Adriana Diego, LeConté Dill, Sameena Eidoo, Genevieve Flores-Haro, Jillian Ford, Leena Her, Nathalia E. Jaramillo, Patricia Krueger-Henney, Claudia Lozáno, Liliana Manriquez, Alberta Salazár, León Salazár, and Lorri Santamaría

Jillian Ford is an associate professor of social studies education at Kennesaw State University. Nathalia E. Jaramillo is a professor of interdisciplinary studies at Kennesaw State University. She is the author of Immigration and the Challenge of Education: A Social Drama Analysis in South Central Los Angeles.
Product Details ISBN: 9780252087493
ISBN-10: 0252087496
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Publication Date: November 21st, 2023
Pages: 224
Language: English
Series: Transformations: Womanist studies
“Inspired by bell hooks’ engaged and transgressive pedagogical discourses, this compelling, informative, ‘disruptive’ anthology captures the powerful reflections of feminist/womanist women of color as they interrogate toxic practices of the white academy in the South. The essays, which cover a rich variety of topics, are candid, brilliant, sobering, informative and inspirational. A must read for strategies to transform higher education during challenging times.”--Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Spelman College